Fragrant Sumac

Scientific Name:  Rhus aromatica

Light:  Sun to Part-Shade

Zone:  3 to 9

Height:  6 feet

Width:  6 to 10 feet

Flowers:  March to May, greenish yellow, Insignificant

Fruit/Seed:  July to March, dark wine red berry, showy

Fall Color:  Red

Butterflies:  The flowers support butterflies.

Birds:   The fruit is an important winter food for birds, including turkey, ruffed grouse, robins, and flickers. It also provide cover for many species of birds.

Hummingbird:

Deer Resistant:  Yes, rarely damaged

Insects/Pollinators:  The flowers support pollinators, especially honeybees and wild bees.

Native:  Mountain and Piedmont in Maryland but not Carroll

Idea Garden:

Categories: , ,

Description

The fruit is an important winter food various small mammals like raccoon, opossum and chipmunk. The foliage is relatively unpalatable to most species of wildlife. Thickets of fragrant sumac provide cover for many small mammals.

Fragrant sumac is used as a ground cover, especially on banks.

Both male and female plants required.

Cultivars/Varieties

‘Gro-low’ –  usually does not exceed 2′ with a spread to 8′ wide, female form that forms red fruits.

‘Konza’ – dwarf form, to 2′ tall.

‘Green Globe’ –  6 foot.

Sources

Native Plants for Wildlife Habitat and Conservation Landscaping: Chesapeake Bay Watershed

Fragrant Sumac – USDA Plant Fact Sheet

Fragrant Sumac – Missouri Botanical Garden

Fragrant Sumac – University of Connecticut Plant Database

Landscape Plants Rated by Deer Resistance – Rutgers

 

Recommended for Wildlife by

Native Plants for Wildlife Habitat and Conservation Landscaping: Chesapeake Bay Watershed

Attracting Wildlife – HGIC

Songbirds – FS613

Twelve Ways to Design a Bird-friendly Garden – Brooklyn Botanical Garden

Landscaping to Attract Birds – Baltimore Bird Club

Essential Native Trees and Shrubs for the Eastern United States by Dove & Woolridge

Photos

Native Plants for Wildlife Habitat and Conservation Landscaping: Chesapeake Bay Watershed

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Herman, D.E., et al. 1996. North Dakota tree handbook. USDA NRCS ND State Soil Conservation Committee; NDSU Extension and Western Area Power Administration, Bismarck.

Additional information

Zones

Zone 5, Zone 6, Zone 7, Zone 8

Light

Part Sun, Sun

Soil

Clay, Loam

Flower Color

Yellow

Flower Season

Spring

Fruit Season

Fall, Spring, Summer, Winter

Native

Mountain, Piedmont

Wildlife Value

Beneficial Insects, Deer Resistant, Food for Birds, Nectar, Summer Cover

Local Availability

Available

Notable Features

Erosion Control, Salt Tolerant

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